South Yorkshire Safer Roads Partnership
Key messages


To download a PDF version of our key messages follow the link below.

 

Key messages by mode

 

Mode

Message

0-16

17-24

25+

Pedestrian

P1

Distractions – Using mobile phones or MP3 players can distract you from traffic on the roads

P2

Stay away from traffic – Always stay on the pavement or footway if there is one provided and stop at the kerb when crossing the road

 

P3

Pedestrian crossings – Use pedestrian crossings where possible – they are provided for your safety

P4

When crossing the road use the green cross code:

Think about the best place to cross

Stop one step back from the kerb

Look to see if it safe to cross, looking in the direction of oncoming traffic first. Look in all directions, and keep looking until you are safely across

Listen for traffic that you may not see, and for emergency vehicles which may appear suddenly. If you hear sirens, do not cross until they have passed. Bear in mind that cyclists and electric vehicles may not make as much noise as other vehicles.

Think when it is safe to cross, and do so in a straight line

 

 

P5

‘Be bright, be seen’ – If you are walking after dark or in low light conditions, wear things which are both bright and reflective to enable other road users to have a better chance of seeing you.

P6

Set a good example – Children learn by observing others. You are your child’s best teacher.

 

 

Cyclists

C1

Lights – At night you must use lit white front lights and red rear lights, and a red rear reflector.

C2

Wear a helmet – We recommend that you wear a correctly fitted helmet.

C3

Observe signs and signals – jumping red lights is illegal and puts you in danger. Obey all traffic signs.

C4

‘Be bright, be seen’ – If you are cycling after dark or in low light conditions, wear things which are both bright and reflective to enable other road users to have a better chance of seeing you.

C5

Ride proactively – Ride decisively and clear of the kerb. Make eye contact with other road users and use signals so that they are aware of your intentions.

C6

Ride safely – Undertaking long vehicles is dangerous – they may not see you if they turn left. Take care around parked cars, watching for doors opening and pedestrians stepping out.

C7

Road positioning – Cyclists can use as much of the lane as you need to feel safe and are allowed to ride double file when cycling in groups.

C8

Consider training opportunities:

Bikeability via schools (0-16)

Training and coaching via local authorities (17-24, 25+)
 

Passengers

G1

Be a responsible passenger – Do not distract the driver, and do not encourage them to take risks.

G2

Speak up – If you do not feel safe, tell the driver. If necessary, ask them to stop so you can get out.

G3

Wear a seatbelt – Children aged 14+ are responsible for their own seatbelts. If the car stops suddenly, you will carry on moving forward at the same speed if you are not properly restrained.

G4

Don’t get in the car with a drink/drug driver  – if you think the driver has been drinking alcohol or is under the influence of drugs, don’t get in the car with them.

Drivers

D1

Beware the Fatal 4     (see messages FD, FS, FM and FB)
Always wear a seatbelt
Do not drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol
Always drive at a speed appropriate for the conditions, and do not break the speed limit
Never use a handheld mobile phone when driving.

 

 

D2

Pass cyclists safely – When overtaking cyclists allow as much room as you would when overtaking a car. We recommend at least 1.5 metres, however in windy or wet conditions allow more space. Only attempt to pass when the road ahead is clear and it is safe to do so.

 

D3

Think Bike – Look out for motorbikes, scooters and cyclists, especially at junctions.

 

D4

Tiredness kills – Plan your journey to include a 15 minute break every two hours. If you’re feeling tired, take a break.

 

D5

Use your indicators – Signal your intentions so that other road users can react.

 

D6

Watch for vulnerable road users – Keep your eyes open for pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders, and don’t drive in such a way that intimidates them or puts them in danger.

When passing horses on the road, give them plenty of space and drive very slowly. Horses are easily scared by noise and vehicles that move off suddenly, so please be considerate. Do not rev your engine or sound your horn.

 

D7

Smart motorways: red X – Never drive in a lane marked with a red X – the reason for the lane closure may not always be obvious.

 

D8

Smart motorways: variable speed – The speed on the M1 may vary according to the conditions or if there is an incident. Observe all variable speed limits – you may receive a fine if you don’t.

 

D9

Driving for business – It is the responsibility of both drivers and staff to ensure they are fit to drive. Employers have a duty of care to ensure work-related journeys are planned properly and completed safely.

 

D10

Have your eyesight checked regularly – good eyesight is essential for driving. You must be able to read a standard number plate at 20 metres

 

 

D11

It is the responsibility of the driver/rider to check whether their prescription or over-the-counter drugs can affect their ability to drive. Always read the label on the packaging of any medicines you are taking. If in doubt speak with a doctor or pharmacist.

 

D12

Check your tyres – Tyres should be inspected at least once a month and before any long journey. Checks should include checking the air pressure, overall condition and tread depth.

 

D13

Consider training opportunities:

Drive for Life
Learn Safe, Drive Safe
Safer Driving at 60 plus
Safer Driving at Work

 

 

Powered two wheelers`

W1

Beware the Fatal 4 (see table above)

Do not ride under the influence of drugs or alcohol

Always ride at a speed appropriate for the conditions, and do not break the speed limit

 

 

✔*

W2

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – wear the right protective clothing. In a collision it could save your skin

 

✔*

W3

Road positioning – Consider where you are in relation to other vehicles, especially their blind spots. Always plan to be in the best position on the road

 

✔*

W4

Drivers aren’t always riders – Drivers may not be aware how quickly a bike can alter speed or direction. Allow for this in your riding plan.

 

W5

Smart motorways: red X – Never ride in a lane marked with a red X – the reason for the lane closure may not always be obvious.

 

W6

Smart motorways: variable speed – The speed on the M1 may vary according to the conditions or if there is an incident. Observe all variable speed limits – you may receive a fine if you don’t.

 

W7

Consider training opportunities:

BikeSafe
CBT Plus
BikerDown!

 

✔*

 

 

* includes 16 year old moped riders

Horse riders

H1

‘Be bright, be seen’ – Riders are encouraged to wear bright and reflective clothing or accessories, and dress their horse accordingly, so that they can be seen by other road users.

H2

Supervising inexperienced riders – Ride in double file when supervising a young or inexperienced riders. The lead horse should take the outside position.

 

H3

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – wear the right protective clothing.

 

 

‘Fatal Four’ key messages

 

Theme

Message

0-16

17-24

25+

Drink and drug driving

FD1

There is no safe limit of alcohol – Even a small amount can affect your perception and reaction times. If you’ve had a drink, don’t drive. If you need to drive, don’t drink.

 

FD2

You may still be over the limit the day after – An average liver can process approximately one unit of alcohol per hour, starting one hour after drinking has stopped. This means that if someone drinks 12 units, it can take them roughly 13 hours to fully sober up.

 

FD3

If you are caught, there will be consequences, none of them good – You may be banned from driving, have points added on your licence, an unlimited fine, or even imprisonment. This will mean increased insurance costs, potential job loss and even restrictions on travel to other countries such as the United States.

 

FD4

It is illegal to drive or ride if you are impaired by drugs – This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines as well as illicit substances such as cannabis or cocaine.

 

FD5

The penalties for drug driving/riding are the same as for drink driving/riding – If you are caught you may banned from driving, have points added on your licence, an unlimited fine, or even imprisonment.

 

FD6

It is the responsibility of the driver/rider to check whether their prescription or over-the-counter drugs can affect their ability to drive/ride – Always read the label on the packaging of any medicines you are taking. If in doubt speak with a doctor or pharmacist.

 

FD7

Get your journey home sorted – if you have had alcohol to drink get a taxi, catch a bus or get a lift from a sober friend.

 

FD8

Think of the consequences – If you kill or seriously injure someone because you were driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol you will have to live with the long-term emotional consequences.

 

Speed

FS1

The speed limit is not a target – It is the absolute maximum and does not mean that it is safe to drive or ride at that speed in all conditions. Factors such as the weather, the state of the road and time of day should be considered when choosing what speed to travel at.

 

FS2

Be aware of stopping distances  – The faster someone is driving, the longer it will take them to stop if something unexpected happens. In wet weather the stopping distances are at least double that of when it is dry. In icy conditions it can be as much as ten times greater than on dry roads.

 

FS3

Streetlights mean 30mph max – In built up areas with streetlights the speed limit, unless otherwise stated, is 30mph. Be aware of pedestrians or parked vehicles which may suddenly move off or pull out in front of you. Travelling at a lower speed will give you more time to recognise and react to hazards.

 

FS4

Take care on country roads – There may be unexpected hazards such as blind bends, blind summits, hidden dips and agricultural traffic. Look out for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders.

 

FS5

Think of the consequences – If you kill or seriously injure someone because you were driving too quickly you will have to live with the long-term emotional consequences.

 

Mobile phones

FM1

Dangerous and illegal – Using a handheld mobile phone when driving or riding is both dangerous and illegal - for any purpose, including using the camera, following a map or checking social media. The law still applies when stopped at traffic lights or queuing in traffic.

 

FM2

Six penalty points and a £200 fine – You can get six penalty points and a £200 fine if you use a handheld mobile phone whilst driving.

 

FM3

New drivers could lose their licence – If you have passed your driving test in the last two years you will automatically lose your licence. You may also see an increase in vehicle insurance costs

 

FM4

Think of the consequences – If you kill or seriously injure someone because you were distracted while driving you will have to live with the long-term emotional consequences.

 

Seatbelts

FB1

Always wear a seat belt – Not wearing a seatbelt can be a fatal decision even on short, familiar journeys and at low speeds.

FB2

You are twice as likely to die in a crash if you are not wearing a seatbelt – Make sure you belt up before you set off, even if it is a short journey on a familiar route.

FB3

Everyone in your vehicle must wear a seatbelt, no matter how short the journey – Failure to wear a seatbelt is against the law. Belt up before starting your engine and keep it on until you are safely parked and the engine is off.

FB4

Air bags are not an alternative to seatbelts – air bags are designed to work in addition to seatbelts and are not a replacement or alternative.

FB5

Car seats – Children must normally use a child car seat until they’re 12 years old or 135 centimetres tall, whichever comes first. Children over 12 or more than 135cm tall must wear a seat belt.

 
 

Communications framework

Name

Key road safety messages

Version

1.2

Last updated

21 August 2018

Review schedule

Annual, ahead of academic year

Review date

30 June 2019

Review body

Safer Roads Practitioners Group

 


For further information about SYSRP and our campaigns and initiatives, or if you have any queries, then contact us using this form or drop an email to enquiries@sysrp.co.uk.

To keep up-to-date with our many events and initiatives around South Yorkshire then follow us @SYSaferRoads.


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